Shawl Tutorial: Adding the Flame

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When adding the flame, you want to think about how big it is going to be. Do you want it to be large and prominent, or small and subtle. I have templates for a few different sized flames that I have used over the years. Whenever I want a new sized flame, I decide about how tall I want it to be. I get a drawing compass (I’m old school here) and set it to half the measurement I want and make a circle. At this point I usually just freehand the center line. I’m sure there are plenty of other ways to make the flame various sizes but this has always worked for me, and technology hates me, so the simpler I keep it, the better off I am. For those of you who have access to a printer, you can print a yin/yang symbol out and cut it in half, using that as your template.

There are many ways to make the edges of the flame neat. I have done a few. My current favorite is to get a complimentary double fold bias tape. After cutting out the flame, I will iron the bias tape into the shape of the flame, it shapes really well this way. Then I sew the tape onto the flame and then attach the flame to the shawl. This is the only way so far that I have attached something to the flame before attaching it. Every other method I have used is to attach the flame to the shawl and then add something else. You can also use ribbons and other kinds of trim to cover the raw edge of the flame after attaching it to the shawl. The very first shawl I ever did I tried folding over the edges of the flame, which only sort of worked and was more of a headache than it was worth. Another good option at this point is applique the edges of the flame.


An example of using ribbon to cover the raw edges of flame



A close up of a raw edge covered in trim



A flame with bias tape attached but not yet attached to the shawl


In terms of adding a flame to a crocheted or knitted shawl, I’ve only done it once. The shawl in question had some nice, large decorative holes. I wove a ribbon through those holes in the shape of a flame. This is only one option and is going to depend a lot on the stitch of the crochet or knitting. I don’t know a ton about knitting or crocheting so I would only really have advice on a case by case basis.


Crocheted shawl with added ribbon flame

 

Merena Orithana

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For bias tape, is there an issue with stretching or keeping the tear shape intact? I've never used it before.
 

Melearlin Valar

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Because I'm nitpicky AF, I will either print out a ying yang blown up to the size I want (and cut out half) or use two small circles inside a large circle in order to figure out a precise flame shape (where both the top and bottom are indented by a semicircle).
 
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For bias tape, is there an issue with stretching or keeping the tear shape intact? I've never used it before.

I have never had an issue, especially when ironing it into shape before sewing, of bias tape stretching. This being said, I have never for the flame made my own, I have only used prepackaged bias tape.
 
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When adding the flame, you want to think about how big it is going to be. Do you want it to be large and prominent, or small and subtle. I have templates for a few different sized flames that I have used over the years. Whenever I want a new sized flame, I decide about how tall I want it to be. I get a drawing compass (I’m old school here) and set it to half the measurement I want and make a circle. At this point I usually just freehand the center line. I’m sure there are plenty of other ways to make the flame various sizes but this has always worked for me, and technology hates me, so the simpler I keep it, the better off I am. For those of you who have access to a printer, you can print a yin/yang symbol out and cut it in half, using that as your template.

There are many ways to make the edges of the flame neat. I have done a few. My current favorite is to get a complimentary double fold bias tape. After cutting out the flame, I will iron the bias tape into the shape of the flame, it shapes really well this way. Then I sew the tape onto the flame and then attach the flame to the shawl. This is the only way so far that I have attached something to the flame before attaching it. Every other method I have used is to attach the flame to the shawl and then add something else. You can also use ribbons and other kinds of trim to cover the raw edge of the flame after attaching it to the shawl. The very first shawl I ever did I tried folding over the edges of the flame, which only sort of worked and was more of a headache than it was worth. Another good option at this point is applique the edges of the flame.


An example of using ribbon to cover the raw edges of flame



A close up of a raw edge covered in trim



A flame with bias tape attached but not yet attached to the shawl


In terms of adding a flame to a crocheted or knitted shawl, I’ve only done it once. The shawl in question had some nice, large decorative holes. I wove a ribbon through those holes in the shape of a flame. This is only one option and is going to depend a lot on the stitch of the crochet or knitting. I don’t know a ton about knitting or crocheting so I would only really have advice on a case by case basis.


Crocheted shawl with added ribbon flame



Roh the added ribbon to the crocheted shawl is a great idea.

The other shawls are very beautiful.
 
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